Mountain Passes

This 4,5 km pass has a classic profile, but the eastern ascent is much longer than the western descent. The pass provides access to the last farm along this rugged valley and is preceded by the Pietersfontein Pass. The two passes run back to back for a distance of 14,4 km and make for a magnificent gravel drive. There aren't many sharp corners, but the gradients get as steep as 1:6. It is the very steep, unguarded drop-offs on the left and the dazzling scenery that make this pass worth seeking out.

The Doornkloof Pass is named after the original farm in the small and compressed valley formed by the Doringkloofrivier. The road is a dead end so you will need to retrace your route back to Pietersfontein. It makes this pass quite exclusive and only the more dedicated pass hunters will seek this one out.

The second portion (descent) of the pass is marked as a private road, so please be aware of a possible trespassing issue, but the sign board announcing this is very small and can easily go unnoticed.

This is an unusual pass in many respects. It has no less than four false summits and displays an altitude variance of 273m over just under 10 km. Although the average gradient is a mild 1:36, there are some sections that are very steep at 1:5. It's located just north-west of Montagu to the north of the famous Koo Valley.

The pass is named after the old and historic Pietersfontein farm which lies at the end of the pass on the north-western side. On offer is a lovely drive through deep kloofs, juxtaposed with wide and sunny valleys smothered in fruit orchards and through all of this a small river provides life giving water to this small farming community.

The other odd feature of this pass is that it has very few bends, but watch out for loose gravel as well as slow moving farm vehicles and livestock on the road. If you drive a 4WD vehicle, it is possible to drive a complete loop and return to your starting point via the Patatsfontein Pass.

The pass is named after the farm in the middle of the traverse of the same name and is located roughly 45 km ESE of Grahamstown. It is also sometimes locally reffered to as the Lower Kaprivier Pass, but with the Kaprivier Pass itself being just 11 km further to the north-west, having such a similar name can only cause confusion.

The pass is virtually a twin of the Kaprivier Pass displaying similar statistics and traversing the same mountain and river valley. It is slightly longer at 4,6 km and contains 16 bends, corners and curves within that distance to produce an average gradient of 1:35, but don't be fooled by that number as there are some steep sections that get as steep as 1:6.

The pass runs along the east-west axis and if your'e driving it in that direction, you will be treated to lovely views over the Lower Kaprivier valley.

It's also well off the beaten track and carries very low traffic volumes, other than the odd farmer. The pass displays a typical inverted clasic profile starting at a high point, then dropping down to a central low point river crossing and rising up the other side.

Be aware that there are some very steep gradients, so light FWD vehicles might experience traction issues in wet weather. We recommend driving this pass as a circular loop with it's sister pass a little further to the north-west, the Kaprivier Pass, which will provide a fabvulous circuit of mixed scenery in tranquil and quiet surroundings.

This lovely pass packs a technical and scenic punch well above its category. It provides access over the Kaprivier from the lower altitude land in the south-west to the mountain ridge in the north-east.

Statistically its a moderate pass, but when the details are examined, it shows no less than 19 bends, corners and curves packed into 4,1 kms and lots of variety. It's also well off the beaten track and carries very low traffic volumes, other than the odd farmer. The pass displays a typical inverted clasic profile starting at a high point, then dropping down to a central low point river crossing and rising up the other side.

Be aware that there are some very steep gradients on the northern section, so light FWD vehicles might experience traction issues in wet weather. We recommend driving this pass as a circular loop with it's sister pass a little further to the east, called the Milton Pass or Lower Kaprivier Pass.

This is one of many poorts in the mountainous region between Steytlerville and Willowmore in the Eastern Cape. It runs along the NW/SE axis and is unusual in that it is much wider than most poorts in South Africa at between 1,2 and 1,4 km. Topographically it looks much more like a valley than a poort. In addition it doesn't display the one key element of all poorts in that there is no river bisecting it.

It's an official poort, so it gets indexed here, regardless of how small or insignificant it might appear. It's 4,5 km long and displays an altitude variance of 68m producing an average gradient of 1:66 with the steepest section just east of the summit, measuring in at 1;14.

This is a safe and easy pass that descends from the coastal plateau down the eastern flank of the Goukou River towards the coastal town of Still Bay. Everything about the pass is moderate but the views to the west are lovely over the river and valley. This is a safe all weather pass with very few dangers and is suitable for all vehicles. On the day of filming there were extensive road works with lengthy delays, so we have yet to film this pass.

The pass only has 5 easy corners and displays an altitude variance of 134m producing an average gradient of a mild 1;29, but there are some steeper sections near the summit area of 1:9

This is a minor little poort of 1,5 km tucked into an east-west running ridge called Rooirant just off the R381 between Beaufort West and Loxton in the Great Karoo. It's quite a mission finding it, involving complex navigation through a number of farm roads. The poort only has a 10m altitude variance, so don't expect exciting driving through this one, as the average gradient is a very gentle 1:150 and the steepest section is at 1:16.

However, it's often the complete sense of solitude that brings the greatest rewards on these far flung farm roads and perhaps the opportunity of spotting some rare bird or animal not normally seen on the busier roads, that bring the greatest rewards.

This easy pass on the N2 just east of Plettenberg Bay climbs 225m up the eastern portal of the Keurbooms River valley via 7 gentle and evenly graded bends. It's exactly 5 km long produces an average gradient of 1:22 with the steepest section registering 1:10. The road is generally in excellent condition and is safe with 80% of the ascent featuring an overtaking lane. However the N2 is generally a very busy road, so expect heavy traffic day and night and be particularly aware of slow moving trucks on both the ascent and the descent.

To the east of the pass is a beautiful section of the Garden Route which includes The Crags, Kurland, Natures Valley and of course there is access to both the Grootrivier Pass as well as the Bloukrans Pass (the latter currently being closed to traffic).

This relatively unknown pass is located high in the mountains about 15 km south-east of De Doorns. It's of above average length at 5,3 km and descends 338m producing an average gradient of 1:16 with the steepest parts reaching 1:7. It offers exceptional mountain scenery as well as four very sharp bends in excess of 100 degrees. The oddly named Dwars in die Weg translates roughly into 'Transversely across the Way', with reference to a stand-alone peak Dwarsberg [1025.4m] which blocks the view near the western foot of the pass.

The road leads to the Keerom Dam. (Turnaround Dam) which is aptly named as this is the end of the road and the route has to be retraced back to the R318. The road is quiet and thoroughly enjoyable to drive. Please read the section on public access carefully in the main body of text lower down, so that you understand exactly at which point the road changes status from public to private.

Cautionaries: Sharp bends, loose gravel, very tight bends, steep unguarded drop-offs.

This minor poort is 1,9 km long and displays a small altitude variance of 39m. As is typical of all poorts, the road follows the course of the river sweeping through a single S-bend with big changes in direction and corners exceeding 150 degrees radius. It is named after the Kranskop farm through which it traverses.

The Pienaarspoortrivier that has carved this path through the mountain ridge forms a confluence with the dominant river in the region - the Grootrivier, which has a huge drainage area and drops through many more major poorts before joining the Kouga River east of Patensie, where the name changes to the Gamtoos River.

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Mountain Passes South Africa

Mountain Passes South Africa is a website dedicated to the research, documentation, photographing and filming of the mountain passes of South Africa.
 

Passes are classified according to provinces and feature a text description, Fact File including GPS data, a fully interactive dual-view map and a narrated YouTube video.
 

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