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The week that was:

* Recce Tour - the journey continues

* Kouga-Baviaans Tour latest

* Ben 10 V3 fully booked

* Wild Coast Tour sold out

* Podcast

* Featured pass of the week

* Words of wisdom


2020 has certainly started with plenty of action and there always seems to be so much to report on, yet so little time to get everything done. The admin office is extremely busy at this time of year processing Ben 10 entries, results, tours, bookings, registrations, validations, radio interviews, social media, magazine writing and not enough time to travel. Phew!

Trips and Tours Update

Recce: We take you with us for our second leg of our Transkei recce trip this week (see lower down).

Kouga-Baviaans Explorer Tour: Our first tour of 2020 comes up mid March where we will be doing the unusual traverse of the Baviaanskloof by starting in Joubertina, where we will spending a full day exploring the Kouga Wilderness. We then head east to Kareedouw and tackle some lovely gravel passes (Suuranysberg, Kouga and Meidenek) after which we will pop in for some light refreshment at the remote Baviaans Lodge run by our long standing friend Rob le Roux. The route then becomes a two spoor track as we wind our way over the protea clad Kouga Mountains past a honey-bush tea farm, that will bring us out at the Doringkloof farm in the central Baviaanskloof. Day 3 involves a traverse of the eastern bio-reserve over the best passes and water crossings of the Baviaanskloof with an overnight stop at the tranquil Bruintjieskraal. The final day we head even further north towards the Cockscomb Mountains and head west along the T3 route via the Antoniesberg Pass and finish up for a festive evening at the Royal Hotel in Steytlerville. We have 3 places still open on this tour. Bookings close next week Friday. MORE INFO & ONLINE BOOKINGS HERE.


Ben 10 V3 Tour: (Easter Weekend) Sorry this tour is now fully booked.


Wild Coast Adventure Tour: This tour is selling fast. There are only 3 places open at time of writing. We are proud to announce our first ever Wild Coast Tour where participants will enjoy 9 days/10 nights savouring the very best the region has to offer. Join us and enjoy driving to places few people have been before – all in the safety of a group of like-minded travellers.

The tour will start in Matatiele and end in Morgans Bay taking in many of the best sights and sounds of the unspoilt and remote Wild Coast, which is still as timeless as it was 70 years ago. Here are some of the points of interest we will be visiting:

*Mariazell Mission Station *Ramalitso’s Pass *Nungi Pass *Colananek Pass *Mzintlava Pass *Mbotyi *Magwa Falls *Lambazi Mouth (Port Grosvenor) * Magwa Tea Plantation * Port St. Johns Airport Pass * Tutor Ndamase Pass *Mlengana Pass & Execution Rock *Coffee Bay *Hole in the Wall *Kob Inn *The Collywobbles *Mveso *Vulture colony *Shixini River Mouth *Nongqawuse’s Pools *Trennerys *Kei River Pont *Morgans Bay and a whole lot more. For more information and online bookings CLICK HERE. (STOP PRESS - The last 3 tickets were sold out between the time the newsletter was written and the publishing time - less than 5 hours)


Part 2 Transkei Recce Trip

I guess I was in a state of disappointed reverie and doing my best not to have an accident in the crazy traffic in Mthatha, where everyone seems hell bent on jamming into every intersection with the traffic lights changing over and over and the cars going nowhere. I eventually scooted down a few side roads (thanks to the nippy Jimny) and managed to extricate myself out onto the Port St Johns road, where my Garmin 276CX with the calm English lady speaking had directed me towards. She might be calm but sometimes she's not that smart, or maybe it's me? (More lower down) 

Published in Mountain Passes News

The two weeks that were

* Report back on the first 2 days of the Wild Coast recce trip

* Baviaans-Kouga Tour coming up in March

* Ben 10 on 6 wheels (Part 2)

* Podcast

* Pass of the week

* Thought for the day


Recce for a week:

Apologies for no newsletter last week. I had very good intentions of writing the newsletter in the evenings during the recce trip, but a combination of events, which included getting lost twice, load shedding, no signal and driver fatigue put paid to those naive notions, so today you're getting a bumper version.

I have to admit that of all the road trips I have done in my life this one was easily the best. It threw everything at me and the challenges were often quite serious - and therein lies the enjoyment. Over the next three weeks we will relate the story for you to enjoy at home. 

To prepare thoroughly for our Wild Coast Tour, I had to do a solo trip with minimal luggage and equipment so as to travel light and efficiently. Calculations prove that we saved R8000 on fuel by using the little 1300cc Suzuki Jimny in favour of the 4.5 Land Cruiser. I can now confidently say after 4000 km, I can evaluate the Jimny on and off-road competently. But let's start at the beginning.

I left Cape Town later than planned and routed to Kirkwood (in preference to PE as I have an aversion of big cities) via Worcester, Robertson, Ashton, Swellendam and from there on the N2 all the way to Uitenhage. We have recently acquired one of the new Jimnys, but decided to use the 2017 model for this trip in the interests of fuel economy.

I refuelled in Robertson and asked the attendant to inflate the Jimny's tyres to 1.6 bar (we normally run at 1.4). He must have thought I was crazy to ride on such soft tyres and took it upon himself to rather put in 2.6 bar but failed to tell me. By the time I reached Swellendam the harsh ride started getting to me, so I decided to check the pressures! Problem solved by deflation and driving became fun again. Later in the trip on the really bad Transkei roads, I lowered pressures down to 1 bar and had a reasonably good result in terms of ride comfort and traction.

At highway speeds the 1.3 Jimny tends to be a little slow (having a happy cruising speed of 100 kph), but on gravel it's simply dynamite. Activate the 4WD button and the Jimny becomes exceptionally agile. The key is getting the tyre pressures right. We found that 1.6 (with a light load) was too hard, but 1.3 all round was fine on good gravel roads and the rough stuff, drop them down to 1.1 or even 1.0 bar. The Jimny is so light, that you will barely notice any sidewall bulging. Having such a short wheel base, if you hit corrugations at speed, the Jimny tends to become a little skittish, but the 4 wheel drive always kicks in to straighten the vehicle out. At first this is a little disconcerting, but one soon gets the hang of it. There is no substitute for gravel road experience. We also found that with the absence of any mass on the roof, its cornering ability on tar and gravel was excellent; often outperforming much bigger and faster vehicles.

The trip went smoothly arriving in Kirkwood at 6.30 pm. Small problem though, as I couldn't find the B&B that I had booked and paid for. It became crystal clear after phoning them that I was in the wrong town. Their establishment was actually in Addo even though a search for "Accommodation - Kirkwood" brought their name up! Don't believe everything you read on the internet! 

I reached "The Kraal" just after 7 pm and checked in for a cold beer and light supper, which had barely been finished, when load shedding began - a perfectly good reason to have an early night. At 3 am there were noises which turned out to be an intruder who had been caught inside the grounds by their security guard, resulting in the police arriving to arrest him.

Part of the recce trip was to film as many passes as possible. Only one pass fell within camera range on day one, which was a small gravel pass near Riversdale called Brakhoogte. [More lower down]

Published in Mountain Passes News

THE WEEK THAT WAS


* Trips & Tours Updates

* Ben 10 V3 Tour fully booked

* King of the Mountains

* Can-do South Africans to aspire towards

* Pass of the Week

* Words of Wisdom


Trips and Tours

Our upcoming Ben 10 V3 Tour has sold out in record time. We will not be running another Ben 10 Tour this year, but will be scheduling the next one for 2021. Tickets for our Kouga Baviaans Explorer Tour in March are selling well with 6 places left at time of writing. We have included a 30 second teaser video lower down on this page to galvanise you into action. We are convinced that this tour is going to be pure magic and quite possibly the best tour we've ever put together. 

Next week we will be heading off to the Wild Coast to do the detailed recce/planning for our longest tour to date: Wild Coast Adventure Tour, which will be held from the 12th to the 20th June, 2020. Keep an eye on our Shop & Tours page for when bookings open.

The Ben 10 Eco Challenge has an almost mystical allure to it. To date 257 people have entered the challenge but only 157 have managed to complete it. There have been some interesting entries. A father and daughter completed the challenge on single speed homemade bicycles on a budget of R20 per day; a motorcyclist rode all the passes in a single day; a man entered the challenge under the name of his dog (see Scruffy de Jager); and recently another dog actually ran all the passes with his owner - ironically the dog's name is Ben!

King of the Mountains

But there is one man who is a step or five ahead of the pack. He is Jaco Pretorius from Pretoria who ran the challenge last year thereby becoming the first runner to complete the event. Jaco was so enthused by his experience that he has decided to expand his challenge. A few weeks ago he tackled the Ben 10 on an MTB and a 4x4 - riding each of the passes first on his bike followed by the 4x4. And if that's not enough, he plans on completing a four way title by also doing the challenge on his adventure motorcycle. Today we feature the first chapter of Jaco's story of how things went. (More lower down...)

Published in Mountain Passes News

The Week that was:

* Kouga-Baviaans Explorer Tour

* Ben 10 V3 Tour

* Garden Route Filming

* Podcast

* South African achievers

* Pass of the week

* Words of wisdom.


Trips and Tours

As promised the first 2 tours for 2020 have been uploaded onto our shop page. The first 5 places on the Ben 10 V3 Tour were sold within a week. Get in early if you want to join either of these tours.


Kouga-Baviaans Explorer Tour (12th to 16th March - 4 days)

This brand new tour promises to be a huge hit. We have been able to creatively plan four sustained days of sublime eco travelling through some of the most isolated and remote sections of the Southern Cape. Our routing begins at Joubertina and heads up into the Kouga Mountains where we will visit the Kouga Wilderness trails as well as drive two scintillating gravel passes all in one day. The next day we drive the Baviaans-Kouga 4x4 route (It's rated Grade 1 to 2, so easy enough for the average driver) and overnight in the Baviaanskloof at Doringkloof & Zandvlakte. All meals and accommodation have been pre arranged.

On Day 3 we drive the beautiful bioreserve section of the Baviaanskloof including all the big passes and the two water crossings with an overnight stop in the Cambria Valley where guests will enjoy a world class potjie specially made for MPSA. The final day we head through the Grootrivierpoort to Patensie, then up the mountain to take the T3 route west via the Antoniesberg Pass and finish in Steytlerville at the Royal Hotel for our final night festivities. Maximum 10 vehicles.

More detailed information and bookings can be done via this link: KOUGA-BAVIAANS EXPLORER TOUR


Ben 10 Tour V3

This year's Ben 10 Tour (and there will only be one in 2020) was planned to fall over the Easter weekend to minimise on having to take leave from work. We have made some more adjustments to the V2 Tour, which include timing it in autumn, where the temperatures should be pleasant, the rain should be over and the scenery should still be lush and green. 

We have also built in an extra day into the tour to allow for contingencies, such as bad weather or mechanical breakdowns. It also gives us a spare day to include some non-pass driving activities like going to see the vulture colonies, visiting the rock art sites or going to see the historical Gatsberg. We have kept our prices very close to last year's price in an effort to make the tour as affordable as possible. More detailed information and bookings can be done via this link: BEN 10 V3 TOUR BOOKINGS

(More lower down...)

 

Published in Mountain Passes News

Naude's Nek Pass in the news

News of a bakkie that drove down a cliff off Naude's Nek Pass last week reached us quite quickly. We were contacted by Die Burger newspaper for our opinion on how dangerous the pass was, but we assured them that the pass was really not dangerous at all in fair weather. It appears that the 71 year old driver had plenty of experience and was driving carefully. The vehicle behind him, who was videoing the trip, stated that there were no brake lights or skid marks - the vehicle simply missed the turn and went straight over the cliff, falling some 100m and killing both occupants. It is our opinion that the driver more than likely had a heart attack or brain aneurism. Further information indicates that the incident did not occur on the pass itself, but on a side road leading to a farm. Our condolences to the family.

Wilderness National Park

This newsletter was produced from our mobile office at Wilderness National Park - a place of natural beauty and tranquility. It is here that we find the inspiration to create new tours, fresh innovative concepts and recharge our 'mojo' batteries. It was at this very campsite back in 2012 that the first concept of Mountain Passes South Africa germinated - almost by accident.

The purchase of a GoPro video camera was where it all started. Idle minds are not necessarily a bad thing, as a thorough exploration of the User Guide prompted me to try out various ideas how I could maximise on the rather large sum of money laid out on the device.

Hiking, diving, climbing, and mountain bike videos were all quite disappointing, so onto the car it went and with surprisingly good results. I then wondered what I could film from the car and that's where the Eureka moment arrived. Nearby Whites Road was the first pass that I experimented with and here we are seven years later and the tally now stands at 888.

At the time I envisioned a compact website featuring just the Cape's best passes, but that idea was soon scrapped when people started asking about Sani Pass, Long Tom Pass and other major passes all over South Africa. The concept was amended and redesigned to cope with this bigger vision.

So the inevitable question is "What will we do when we have all 1100 passes filmed and documented"?

The reality is that early passes need to be refilmed and the work and progress never stops.

Published in Mountain Passes News

The week that was!

* The festive season is over - it's back to work!

* Report back on the final leg of our recent Lesotho Tour.

* Podcast - Listen to a talk on the impact of social media

* Pass of the week

* Words of wisdom


Back to work!

The silly season is over. We hope your waistline coped with the onslaught, but more seriously that you managed to survive the roads. We haven't received official accident figures yet and it's not our station to report on bad news, so I'm sure you will hear the statistics on the main stream news channels. 

Lesotho Tour - the adventure continues

Driving past the Letseng mine is similar to the mines on the Witwatersrand, except the man made mountains are grey instead of cream coloured. Once past Letseng there is a long and steady descent to the main town in the area.

Mokhotlong is located in the mountainous north-eastern part of Lesotho. The name is a Sesotho word which means "Place of the Bald Ibis". Thabana Ntlenyana, the highest point in southern Africa, is found near the town.

Mokhotlong’s role as a police post first brought people to this part of Lesotho in 1905, and it developed into a trading centre for the Highlands region. However, it was preserved from major development by its remote location. Not until 1947 was radio contact established with Maseru, the capital city. An air strip was built and a road cleared through the town to link Mokhotlong with the rest of Lesotho, but even so, it continued to be outfitted with provisions and supplies by pack mules from South Africa via Sani Pass.

Our convoy rumbled on to reach the 14th pass of the tour - the Kotisephola Pass (or Black Mountain Pass). 

This is a mega pass by any standards. It's very long at 32 km and displays an altitude variance of 1066m. With a summit height of 3244m ASL, headaches and nose bleeds might be experienced by travellers from the coast who have not had time to acclimatise. 

Packed into that length is a total of 139 bends, corners and curves of which 8 have angles in excess of 90 degrees and of those, 6 are hairpin bends, all of which occur on the south-eastern section of the pass. The pass is subject to lots of snow in winter and ice on the roadway will make things highly dangerous, even for 4WD vehicles. Chatting over the two way radios we recalled driving this pass in 2012 whilst construction was underway and the very odd sight of seeing Chinese trucks and road building equipment as well as Chinese nationals doing the manual labour. We never saw a single local employed on these projects. 

Rumours abounded at the time of the Chinese labourers being convicts. After completing their "sentence" it was said that they were then free to live in Lesotho as free men but were not allowed to return to China. Whether any of these stories were fact or fiction, we do not know. But what we do know is that the time it took to drive the pass then and now was about 80% shorter. The roads are actually excellent and a real pleasure to drive on.

It didn't take long and we arrived at the Lesotho border post at the summit of the Sani Pass. We stopped in at the highest pub in Africa for a bit of refreshment. We could not have wished for more perfect weather and for your scribe this was the first time ever traversing this iconic pass in clear weather. What a treat.

High on the Drakensberg escarpment, on the border between South Africa and Lesotho, Sani Mountain Lodge (previously known as Sani Top Chalets) offers comfortable accommodation beneath a sea of stars at night and breathtaking landscapes during the day. Sani Mountain Lodge boasts stunning views, cosy fires, adventure, and great hospitality. [More lower down...] 

Published in Mountain Passes News

The week that was!

* New Year's message

* Lesotho Tour (Chapter 7)

* Bedrogfontein Tour (Chapter 4)

* Pass of the week

* Words of Wisdom


Happy New Year!

From the team at Mountain Passes South Africa, we wish you a year of health, happiness and of course - travel. The year ahead is filled with the promise of exciting challenges and it's so often one's attitude that makes all the difference when it comes to achieving goals. So don't go on a diet, but rather make a lifestyle change so that it's permanent. Don't procrastinate, for as we all know a 'draadsitter' is not a cool person. Make decisions. Do those trips. Live your dreams. Take risks. Apologise. Forgive. Dream. Love and respect your fellow man/woman. 

Some changes for 2020

Each January we review our pricing on goods and services and adjust where applicable. We are exceptionally conscious of retaining our current subscribers and to reinforce that we are only increasing our 12-month subscription renewals by R10. This brings renewals to just R280. The rate for new subscribers will be R350 for the 12-month subscription, and for those choosing the 6 month option, it will be R250.

We have expanded our gifting options to include coffee mugs, T shirts, Golf shirts, caps and Gift Vouchers. For those that have completed the Ben 10 Eco Challenge, we have a separate range of souvinier gear.

This newsletter will be published every fortnight in future as opposed to once per week, but will retain the same format that you are accustomed to.


Lesotho-Sani Tour - Oxbow to Letseng

The third day of the tour saw a perfect 'blue sky' day with no wind and pleasant temperatures. Our convoy rolled out of the new Oxbow Lodge bang on time and headed south-east to tackle the 11th pass of the tour - the Mahlasela Pass. Not many people know this, but this pass is the highest pass in Lesotho at 3279m ASL with a big ascent of 740m. Once again it was a question of having to engage 1st gear to get up some of the steeper sections in the oxygen starved air. It's another long pass at just under 18 km with magnificent scenery.

As the pass is completed Afriski Resort makes its appearance. We were doing good time, so we popped in at Afriski for a look around. Situated in the heart of the Maluti Mountains, this luxury resort caters to every taste and offers the perfect escape for sport and outdoor enthusiasts, corporate parties as well as families. With a selection of accommodation options, as well as a range of on-site facilities and restaurants, Afriski has everything needed for the perfect mountain getaway. In summer, ambitious mountain goats explore the peaks in pursuit of a wide range of outdoor endeavours. The resort welcomes mountain bikers, trail-runners, hikers, fly fishermen as well as enduro and off-road enthusiasts. Multiple trails, paths and streams await discovery. When the seasons turn and the cold descends, the ski slopes come to life, and log fires in the evening provide time to unwind, kick back and relax. [More lower down...]

Published in Mountain Passes News

The Inside Story

* The year that was

* New merchandise

* Lesotho-Sani Tour - the final chapter

* Bedrogfontein-Zuurberg Tour - Chapter 3.

* Podcast - Listen to the highlights of the Lesotho Tour

* Pass of the Week

* Words of wisdom


Adieu 2019

This is our final newsletter of 2019, when it's customary for us to take a look at the metaphorical road that we have travelled this year. It is also an opportunity to thank you for your support and encouragement and to wish you the very best of health and happiness for the year ahead.

In February 2019 we turned professional. This was a major decision after having spent the past 45 years running a different business, but everything has turned out better than expected and the additional time we are now able to invest in the MPSA project is bearing fruit.

Our biggest growth has come from the social media side of things where we put a LOT of effort into creating interesting and varied posts. Between Dec 2018 and Dec 2019 we amassed over 10,000 new followers on our Facebook page and the current rate of growth is about 1000 new followers per month. The total at the moment is 23,000 - that number having been reached on Christmas Eve.

Many people ask me why we put so much effort into social media when it doesn't bring in any income. The reason is that we are building MPSA into a national brand. It works on the principle of first having to give, before receiving. Some simple arithmetic shows the following. An average MPSA post is seen by about 3000 people. We post 8 times per day so that makes 24,000 post views a day; 168,000 per week; 722,000 per month and 8,600,000 per year. We have had a Facebook presence since 2013, so that is 60,681,000 post views over that period. Those figures are conservative. It's probably a lot more, but it illustrates what is possible to achieve on a small budget. Building a credible brand is key to having a sustainable business and with the power of social media it is possible, but most new businesses opt for sponsored (paid) posts. Those simply don't have the credibility of organic posts. But we warned it requires consistent and sustained creative effort.

Having said that, moderating the page requires patience, people skills and an enormous amount of time. With the credibility factor comes a level of respect and discipline which most followers abide by and after 7 years everyone knows what is required in terms of keeping the party clean - and especially positive. Now you know!

We enjoyed a very successful year with our tours, with all but 2 of them being fully booked. The tours also consume a huge amount of time - and it's all in the planning and getting the details right so that our clients enjoy a seamless experience. We had our fair share of drama on tours, losing a Land Rover in a flooded river; a motorcycle stranded on top of Bastervoetpad; a broken suspension on the summit of Ben MacDhui; a stranded Jeep with injector issues and several punctures and a few lost tyres. It's all part of the risk and excitement but we dealt with all those issues with aplomb. We will be working very hard over the next two weeks setting up the draft plans for all the tours in 2020, so do remember to come back and check our tours page to see what's on offer. Our return business ratio on our tours reached 70% by November. A sure sign that we are getting the formula right.

Our subscriber base has enjoyed good growth in 2019 and especially pleasing is to see how many subscribers are signing up from overseas. Expats longing for South Africa make up a fair portion of those overseas subscribers. Clients from Europe are especially appreciative of the website, stating that it allows them to plan an extended trip through South Africa and arrive armed with knowledge and confidence.


MPSA Coffee Mugs and new T-Shirts

Brand new merchandise on our shop page is now available. We have introduced a coffee mug into our range (the same one that guests on our tours receive) as well as new T-shirts and Golf shirts specially chosen for fabric suited to travelling. As always our subscribers get a discount. Check out the pics and pricing of the new merchandise at the MPSA Shop.


Lesotho-Sani Tour (Chapter 6)

We were ticking off some of the biggest passes in Lesotho on our second day on tour and still more passes beckoned. Next up was the Moteng Pass.

This major pass is located between the town of Kala in the west and the Afriski Resort in the north in the northern quartile of Lesotho. It has a huge altitude gain of 896m that stretches over a distance of 15.3 km which converts into an average gradient of 1:17, but don't be fooled by that figure as it includes the descent. Most of the ascent from the western approach is between 1:5 and 1:8.

The 91 bends, corners and curves will require your full concentration. Amongst those there are 4 extreme hairpin bends and one full horseshoe. The A1 road is the major route across the northern sector of Lesotho and as such carries a fair volume of traffic including some very large trucks. These need the full width of the road to negotiate the hairpin bends, so be fully aware of this as you proceed along this pass.

[More lower down...] 

Published in Mountain Passes News

What's inside?

* Christmas Greetings

* Gift a special friend with a lasting gift

* Lesotho-Sani Tour (Chapter 5)

* Bedrogfontein-Zuurberg Tour (Chapter 2)

* Featured pass of the week - Witsieshoek

* Words of wisdom


Merry Chistmas!
2019 has been a long, tough year for many South Africans and in many cases the phrase "money's too tight to mention" applies. The weak economy has taken its toll in every sphere. From the MPSA point of view we have done our best to keep our prices of all our products as affordable as possible and intend continuing in that vein for 2020.

We wish you and your family a peaceful and blessed Christmas. Stay positive and focus on the good all around you. It is possible to avoid negative news to a large extent. We attempt to only post positive uplifting material and that formula seems to be working for example on our FaceBook page which more than doubled in followers this past year. That growth has been exponential.

Don't miss next week's news release on the 26th December, where we will turn back the clock and review the year that was.
Until then, be safe & drive defensively.


Give someone a classy Christmas gift that costs just R300

Click on the link > Fill in the details of the recipient > Add your message > Pay with your card or do an EFT > Voila! Christmas shopping done. The recipient will remember your thoughtful gift for a full year and beyond.


 

Lesotho-Sani Tour (Chapter 5)

With the tour of the Katse Dam completed we were a little pressed to make up some time and several big passes to conquer. As we bade farewell to the charms of the Katse Lodge, we commenced almost immediately with the first pass of the day - the Nkoabee Pass.

This is another big tarred pass covering 16.2 km. It is one of several big passes along the A25 and connects Seshute in the north with the Katse Dam complex in the south. There are 95 bends corners and curves to contend with, of which 23 have angles greater than 90 degrees, but there are no hairpins.

The altitude variance of 624m means lots of ascending and descending and although the road is tarred, caution needs to be exercised in terms of traffic volumes and the very real possibility of finding livestock on the road.

The pass offers very good elevated views of sections of the Katse Dam. It gives access to two airports - Katse Airport at the southern end and Seshutes airport at the northern end.

Starting in the north, the pass starts at the apex of a tight left-hand bend near the runway of the Seshutes Airport. The road heads south, steadily gaining altitude as it worms its way in and out of the side ravines. Although the ascent is long at 6.1 km, the climb gradient is comfortable, seldom exceeding 1:14. The river visible along the ascent is the Matsoku River.

[Click here to read the rest of this story...]

Published in Mountain Passes News

What's inside?

* Weather gone wild

* The perfect Christmas gift

* Exploring the Katse Dam

* Podcast - Lesotho passes

* Featured pass of the week

* Words of wisdom



Weather in full battle cry

From droughts and record high temperatures to floods. The Apiesrivier and Bronkhorstsruit in the Pretoria area are in flood and Potchefstroom has also experienced heavy rain. Many parts of the Free State and Northern Cape (including flooding in Upington) have brought welcome relief to struggling farmers and the country's dams are starting to fill. On our FaceBook page we posted a photo of a motorist crossing a flooded river at great and unnecessary risk to his life. We are assuming it's a 'he' as women just wouldnt take those risks.

We've said it a hundred times before - If you're not prepared to walk it, then don't drive it!


Give someone a classy Chistmas gift that costs just R300

Click on the link > Fill in the details of the recipient > Add your message > Pay with your card or do an EFT > Voila! Christmas shopping done. The recipient will remember your thoughtful gift for a full year and beyond.


 

Lesotho-Sani Tour (Chapter 4)

Saturday 28th September - We woke to a crisp sunny day at our overnight accommodation at the Katse Lodge. (We have just had news that the lodge will be closed for 2020 as they are doing extensive renovations). After a hearty breakfast we got everyone down to the interpretative centre above the Katse dam wall, where we had made arrangements for a guided tour at 08h30. After 10 minutes waiting there was still no guide, so we took our group down the little pass and over the bridge at the Malimabatso river and up the other side of the gorge where we were permitted to drive over the dam wall and as the guard explained to us, we were not allowed to stop on the wall unless in the company of the official guide.

Once over the wall, we located a large tarred parking area and walked back over the wall. This little excursion which is part of the official dam tour took up 30 minutes and by the time we returned to the interpretive centre, we just made the start of the talk by our guide, who had arrived half an hour late. The talk was fascinating and we all then drove down to the bottom of the wall for the tour inside the wall itself. There is strictly no photography allowed and a guard bringing up the tail end of the group ensures this is enforced.

The thickness of the wall at the base is 60m and a series of arched tunnels run in both directions as well as upward and downward by several levels. It's a little eerie inside the wall and the steady drips of water running underfoot via shallow channels do cause a sense of awareness of "what if?..."

Every 50m or so there are stainless steel measuring devices where concrete sections meet. These measure minute movements within the structure and are carefully monitored on a regular basis.

Published in Mountain Passes News

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Mountain Passes South Africa

Mountain Passes South Africa is a website dedicated to the research, documentation, photographing and filming of the mountain passes of South Africa.
 

Passes are classified according to provinces and feature a text description, Fact File including GPS data, a fully interactive dual-view map and a narrated YouTube video.
 

Master Orientation Map

Master Orientation Map We are as passionate about maps as we are about mountain passes. A good map is a thing of beauty that can transport you into the mists of time or get your sense of adventure churning. It is a place to make discoveries about deserts and seas, mountains and lakes; of roads leading into places you have not been before; a place to pore over holiday destinations or weekend camping trips. A map is your window to the world.

View Master Orientation Map...